England bowler Mark Wood to undergo scan on left foot following injury vs Australia

Mark Wood will undergo a scan on his left foot after injuring it while bowling for England against Australia on Saturday, the ECB has announced.

A day on from the incident which saw Eoin Morgan sustain a minor fracture in his left index finger, Wood abandoned his run-up midway through his fourth over with discomfort in his left foot.

That raised immediate concerns given the 29-year-old’s persistent left ankle problems and the fact that caution over his fitness has restricted him to just one competitive match since the start of the season.

While Morgan received a reasonable prognosis, ruled out of Saturday’s clash at the Ageas Bowl but told he should be ready to lead the side in the tournament opener against South Africa next Thursday, Wood is waiting to hear his own fate.

An ECB said: “Mark Wood is to have a precautionary scan. England’s medical team want to ensure there is nothing serious in the build-up to the start of the World Cup.”

In the minutes before his untimely exit, Wood had offered a reminder of his talents, nudging the speed gun toward 93mph and taking the wicket of Australia captain Aaron Finch with a smart slower ball.

England do not have an official standby list for the competition but any vacancies in the pace attack would surely be filled by Yorkshire’s David Willey, who was named in the preliminary squad only to miss the final cut.

Liam Dawson made the opposite journey, named in the final 15 having been initially overlooked, and he also had a painful experience in Southampton.

The left-arm spinner was backing up a throw from Joe Root when the ball kicked up and struck him hard on the right ring finger and split the skin.


England vs S Africa

May 30, 2019, 9:30am

Live on

He made his way to the dressing room, where the decision was made to pull him from the batting line-up – possible only because of the flexible playing conditions afforded to warm-up fixtures.

As well as Morgan, Wood and Dawson, England are managing two other long-term issues.

Source: Read Full Article