DMX and Johnny Messner Hunt Steven Seagal in Bloody Trailer for 'Beyond the Law' (Exclusive Video)

Action-thriller from director James Cullen Bressack gets day and date release on Dec. 6

It’s hard to tell good from evil in “Beyond the Law,” but in the brutal first trailer, released ahead of its upcoming day and date release, Johnny Messner and DMX are determined to figure it out. Despite, of course, the violence meted out by a host of thugs — and Steven Seagal’s trademark wrist-snap. Watch the new trailer, and a lot of brutal beatdowns, exclusively above.

From director James Cullen Bressack (“Alone,” “Bethany,” “Blood Craft”), “Beyond the Law” stars Messner (“Silencer,” “Weaponized”) as an ex-cop dragged back into his old life after his estranged son is murdered. With nothing to lose, he searches for answers among the city’s most corrupt and dangerous people, and crosses paths with a veteran detective (DMX) also determined to uncover the truth. But as their investigations drag them deeper into the criminal underworld, the come up against the local mob, and a mysterious criminal enforcer (Seagal).

“Beyond the Law” opens theatrically Dec. 6 in 11 markets and 20 cities, including Los Angeles, Atlanta, Houston and Toronto; it will also be available day and date on-demand and on digital platforms.

The film, from Cinedigm Corp., also stars Zack Ward (“Transformers”) and Chester Rushing (“Stranger Things”), with Bill Cobbs (“Demolition Man”) rounding the cast out as the rough yet compassion friend and mentor to Messner’s former cop.

Written by Chad Law and Johnny Martin Walters, “Beyond the Law” is produced by Bressack, Timothy Woodward Jr., and Micah E. Brandt, and co-produced by Gordon Woloson. Matthew Helderman, Luke Dylan Taylor, Joe Listhaus, Randy Charach, Kim DeLonghi and Patrick DePeters serve as executive producers, with Kirk Shaw and Dan Grodnik co-executive producing.

Along with the trailer comes an official, extremely throwback (in a good way) poster. Check it out below:

Cinedigm

10 Tough Guys Babysitting Kids in Movies, From 'Kindergarten Cop' to 'Playing With Fire' (Photos)

  • From Arnold Schwarzenegger to Dwayne Johnson, action stars who have wanted to take a break from intense action movies have frequently turned to family-friendly comedies, which allows them to reach a more mainstream audience. But starring with a child co-star a third your age and size means you’ll have to wear a tutu or dance like a doofus and maybe fall in something slimy. Wrestler-turned-action-star John Cena is the latest to make this pivot with “Playing With Fire,” opening this weekend. Here are some other examples of this genre of tough guys babysitting kids.

    Universal/Disney/Disney/Paramount

  • “Three Men and a Baby” (1987) – Tom Selleck

    One of the first movies of this genre, “Three Men and a Baby” was a massive box office success in 1987, pulling in $167 million domestically. Tom Selleck, Ted Danson and Steve Guttenberg star in the comedy about three eligible bachelors who wind up in over their heads caring for a baby. The film is directed by Leonard Nimoy and is a remake of a French film. It’s far more grounded and realistic than how zany and action-heavy the genre would become.

    Buena Vista Pictures

  • “Kindergarten Cop” (1990) – Arnold Schwarzenegger

    “Kindergarten Cop” wasn’t the first (or the last) goofy comedy Arnold Schwarzenegger would make, but in this one, he berates at a classroom full of toddlers, plays with a ferret and teaches kids the basics about human anatomy. His line reading of “It’s not a tumor!” is an underrated contender for one of his most memorable movie quotes. Schwarzenegger would also soon after this star in the manic holiday comedy “Jingle All the Way.”

    Universal Pictures

  • “Mr. Nanny” (1993) – Hulk Hogan

    Hulk Hogan’s acting career didn’t exactly take off, but 1993’s “Mr. Nanny” would start a string of film and TV appearances that the wrestling legend did alongside other WWF specials throughout the ’90s. This film combines some “Home Alone” shenanigans as Hogan looks after kids as they repeatedly booby trap the house with tripwires or magnets in an attempt to get him to leave, even nearly electrocuting him with one prank.

    New Line Cinema

  • “Cop and a Half”  (1993) – Burt Reynolds

    The Henry Winkler-directed film starred Burt Reynolds in a buddy comedy where the star is actually an 8-year-old boy played by Norman D. Golden II. He wants to learn to be a cop and cuts a deal to go on a ride-along after he’s a witness to a crime. Reynolds drives him around as he helps to foil bad guys by kicking them in the groin or throwing soccer balls and Twinkies.

    Universal Pictures

  • “The Pacifier” (2005) – Vin Diesel

    Coming off the box office bomb “The Chronicles of Riddick” after leaving the “Fast & Furious” franchise, Vin Diesel then turned to the Disney movie “The Pacifier,” where he got stuck changing poopy diapers and driving a minivan. Instead of strapping on ammo and guns, there’s a scene of him gearing up with juice boxes and two child carriers on his front and back.

    Walt Disney Pictures

  • “Are We There Yet?” (2005) – Ice Cube

    Even one of the hardest rappers of all time found himself looking after a pair of bratty kids in this 2005 comedy. Ice Cube goes on a road trip with two kids in order to impress their mom, who he’s dating, only to discover that they torture every man she brings home. Cube endures a yellow paint scuff and vomit all over his car before eventually leaping from a moving train and getting into a fight with a reindeer.

    Columbia Pictures

  • “The Game Plan” (2007) – The Rock

    In “The Game Plan,” Dwayne Johnson plays a football MVP who learns he has a young daughter (Madison Pettis) who quickly dominates his life, dressing his bulldog in a tutu and bedazzling his Super Bowl game ball. In one scene, Johnson has to film a commercial with a high-pitched lisp after he’s allergic to the cinnamon in his daughter’s cookies. If you think he looks silly here, The Rock would don a pair of wings and hockey pads to star in “Tooth Fairy” three years later.

    Walt Disney Pictures

  • “The Spy Next Door” (2010) – Jackie Chan

    Jackie Chan was in his 50s when he made “The Spy Next Door,” so his days of running up walls were over and replaced with using kid-friendly spy gadgets to cook breakfast, take out the trash or help a little girl get into her pajamas. He even attacks Russian mobsters with frying pans and the extendable dishwashing hose on the sink.

    Lionsgate

  • “Playing With Fire” (2019) – John Cena

    John Cena plays an elite firefighter who meets his match when he has to care for a family of three kids after he rescues them from a burning building. Of course, the kids make a mess of the station and launch flare guns or careen around the room with a firehouse, which leads to a lot of Cena falling on his back and furrowing his brow in frustration.

    Paramount Pictures

  • “My Spy” (2020) – Dave Bautista

    This Dave Bautista comedy got punted to early 2020 after it was supposed to open this past summer. Bautista stars as a bumbling CIA agent who gets his cover blown by a 9-year-old girl (Chloe Coleman) and is forced to teach her how she can be a spy. This involves lessons to look away from explosions, games of dodge ball, tripping snot-nosed punks on an ice rink and Bautista frantically rescuing a pet fish.

    STXfilms

Arnold Schwarzenegger, Dwayne Johnson, John Cena and Vin Diesel have all starred in similar family-friendly, action comedies

From Arnold Schwarzenegger to Dwayne Johnson, action stars who have wanted to take a break from intense action movies have frequently turned to family-friendly comedies, which allows them to reach a more mainstream audience. But starring with a child co-star a third your age and size means you’ll have to wear a tutu or dance like a doofus and maybe fall in something slimy. Wrestler-turned-action-star John Cena is the latest to make this pivot with “Playing With Fire,” opening this weekend. Here are some other examples of this genre of tough guys babysitting kids.

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